General Information

Welcome

Greene Acres Community Garden is located on the corner of Franklin and Greene Avenues in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. The Garden has also been known as Frank Greene Garden, Franklin Avenue Community Center, Sunflower Garden for People, Revolutionary Garden Workers Collective, and, not long ago, the Empty Lot on the Corner.

Spring 2015

The next meeting is Monday, April 13 at 7pm in the garden (or at the YMCA on Bedford at Monroe in case of bad weather.) The April work day is Saturday, April 18 at 11am. All are welcome. Prospective members: We voted in summer 2014 to close membership. We may consider new members beginning in June 2015. To learn more, please attend a monthly garden meeting.

Stay tuned for spring events, including a Poetry Month celebration in April and our annual block party Saturday, June 6. Elsewhere, Making Brooklyn Bloom comes to the Brooklyn Botanic Garden on March 14, and GreenThumb's Grow Together is on March 21.

Winter at the garden

The garden is officially closed until April, but meetings, work days and composting sessions continue during winter. The next meeting is Monday, March 9, 2015 at 7pm downstairs at the YMCA, 1121 Bedford Ave. We do not have a February work day. The next work day is Saturday, March 14, 11-3pm.

Thanks, gardeners and friends, for a great season!

October: meeting, work day, chicken project

The next meeting is Monday, October 13 (Columbus Day) at 7pm. The next work day is Saturday, October 18 from 11-3pm. The chicken committee will renovate the coops and yard on Saturday, October 11. Please consider donating to our fundraiser, A Yard for the Yard Birds.

October is the final official month of the 2014 season at Greene Acres. Don't forget to sign up for open hours! We do meet during the winter, usually at the YMCA on Bedford Avenue.

May meeting and work day

The next meeting is Monday, May 12 at 7pm in the garden. The next work day is Saturday, May 17 from 11-3. All are welcome.

The chickens

In the fall of 2012, Greene Acres took in three Rhode Island Red chickens. They quickly befriended members and visitors to the garden. Sadly, one died the next spring, and by February 2014 our Lucy was all alone. But that spring, we met some members of nearby community garden Myrtle Village Green who were scrambling to find a place for their four evicted hens. Lucy was lonely, so we introduced them. They fought, of course, and peed on one member, but within a few days they established a pecking order. The girls are stars of the garden, with many daily visitors. Everyone is welcome to feed them kale, hold them, and watch them roam when caretakers let them out.

The chickens are five breeds: Lucy, the Rhode Island Red; Olga, the shirt-wetting black Australorp; Alice, the White Wyandotte; Slow Lois, the blonde Red Star; and Beatrice, the salt-and-pepper Barred Rock.

Garden Plan

Jonathan P. created this plan of the garden in 2009. Elizabeth updated it in 2012 with plot numbers and the addition of plot 25.

The Benefits of Having an Organic Garden

I'm a freelance writer who has a growing interest in organic gardens. A couple of weeks ago, I wrote a term paper on the benefits organic gardens have on everything and everyone. Here is a summary of my work. May it inspire you to share my new-found passion.

1. Organic gardens are grown without the use of chemicals, making their crops and animals healthier and tastier for all of us.

The Pond at Greene Acres

Greene Acres gardeners dug our pond during the summer of 2004, with the help of the New York Restoration Project. The dry stream bed leading to the pond funnels excess runoff from the rainwater collection tank into the pond.

We working to create a self-contained ecosystem where all parts of the pond (fish, plants, snails, frogs, algae) have everything they need to survive. At this beginning stage it's all pretty delicate. If anyone sees someone feeding the fish or putting things into the pond, please ask them to stop. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to help, so get in touch with Masha, our "pond scientist" to find out more about what is going on with the pond.